80% of London’s Offices Need Upgrading To Meet New Energy Efficiency Regulations

80% of London’s offices need upgrading to meet new energy efficiency regulations

The majority of London’s office buildings do not meet future minimum standards on energy performance certificates (EPCs), a Deloitte’s latest London Office Crane Survey has found.

Minimum Energy Efficiency Standards Regulations

The Minimum Energy Efficiency Standards (MEES) regulations prohibit landlords of non-domestic private rented properties in England and Wales, including public sector landlords, from granting tenancies to new or existing tenants if the property has an Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) rating of band F or G.

This regulation came into effect on April 1st, 2018 and will apply to all existing leases as well from April 1st, 2023.

 

MEES are set to become increasingly stringent, requiring a minimum EPC rating of B by 2030 and an interim requirement of C by 2027.

 

These regulations aim to improve the energy efficiency of the built environment and reduce greenhouse gas emissions in order to meet the UK’s net zero targets.

Landlords have two options:

  1. Implement energy efficiency improvements to bring the building to at least an E rating.
  2. Claim an exemption under certain circumstances, such as listed buildings, places of worship, and temporary structures.


How Lighting Can Help with MEES Regulations 

The Minimum Energy Efficiency Standards (MEES) regulations have an impact on lighting in non-domestic private rented properties in England and Wales. One of the ways landlords can improve the energy efficiency of their properties is by upgrading lighting systems.

The MEES regulations state that landlords must not grant a tenancy to new or existing tenants if the property has an Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) rating of band F or G. In order to bring the building to at least an E rating, landlords can consider upgrading their lighting systems.

One option for landlords is to upgrade to LED lighting, as it is known to be more energy-efficient than traditional lighting options. LEDs can have a significant impact on the energy efficiency of a building and as a result, can help improve the EPC rating of the property.

 

In addition to upgrading to LED lighting, landlords can also consider implementing lighting controls to improve the energy efficiency of their properties. Lighting controls can help reduce energy consumption by adjusting the lighting in the property based on occupancy and natural light levels.

 

One example of lighting control is occupancy sensors, which automatically turn lights off when a room is unoccupied and turn them back on when someone enters. Another example is daylight harvesting, which adjusts the lighting in a room based on the amount of natural light coming in through windows. This can help reduce the need for artificial lighting and thus save energy.

 

Overall, upgrading to LED lighting and implementing lighting controls can have a significant impact on the energy efficiency of a building and can help improve the EPC rating of the property, making it compliant with the MEES regulations and reducing energy consumption and costs.